Posted by: retarigan | April 26, 2015

Word Dictionary [260415]


Word of the day: defy
Definition: v.tr. resist openly; refuse to obey.
Synonyms: withstand, hold, hold up
Etymology: ME f. OF defier f. Rmc (as DIS-, L fidus faithful) (more…)

pronunciation: dɪˈfaɪ

from Oxford: defy

v.tr. (-ies, -ied)
1 resist openly; refuse to obey.
2 (of a thing) present insuperable obstacles to (defies solution).
3 (foll. by to + infin.) challenge (a person) to do or prove something.
4 archaic challenge to combat.
Etymology: ME f. OF defier f. Rmc (as DIS-, L fidus faithful)

from Wordnet: defy

v 1: resist or confront with resistance; “The politician defied public opinion”; “The new material withstands even the greatest wear and tear”; “The bridge held” [syn: withstand, hold, hold up]
2: elude, esp. in a baffling way; “This behavior defies explanation” [syn: resist, refuse] [ant: lend oneself]
3: challenge: “I dare you!” [syn: dare]

from Wikipedia: defy; To defy means to challenge or combat.Defy may refer to: Defy Appliances, a South African appliance manufacturer Motorola Defy, an Android-based smartphone from Motorola Defy Thirst, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization

Quote of the day: A very small degree of hope is sufficient to cause the birth of love. by Henri B. Stendhal

Gian Paolo Lomazzo

Gian Paolo Lomazzo

Birthday of the day: Gian Paolo Lomazzo; Gian Paolo Lomazzo (26 April 1538 – 27 January 1592; his first name is sometimes also given as ‘Giovan’ or ‘Giovanni’) was an Italian painter, more remembered for his writings on art theory, belonging to the second generation that produced Mannerism in Italian art and architecture.

Joke of the day: A young girl came home from a date looking sad. She told her mother, ‘Charles proposed to me a few minutes ago.’ ‘Then why are you so sad?’ her mother asked. ‘Because he also mentioned he is an atheist. Mom, he doesn’t believe there’s hell!? Her mother replied, ‘Marry him anyway. Between the two of us, we’ll show him how wrong he is.’

Thought of the day: It is not the strongest of the species that survive, but the one most responsive to change.

Fact of the day: 1336 – Francesco Petrarca (Petrarch) ascends Mont Ventoux.

Biography of the day: Marcia Davenport; Marcia Davenport (9 June 1903-16 Jan. 1996), author and critic, was born Abigail Glick in New York City to Bernard Glick, an insurance agent, and Reba Fiersohn Glick. Both parents were the children of Jewish ?migr?s from eastern Europe who settled in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. During her early childhood she spent several summers in Italy, France, and Switzerland with her mother, who was studying voice abroad in preparation for a career as a concert singer. Mother and daughter returned to New York in 1909, and later that year Reba Glick, now known as Alma Gluck, made her professional debut in a well-received concert performance at the Metropolitan Opera.

Article of the day: Constance Stokes; Constance Stokes (1906–1991) was a modernist Australian painter working in Victoria. She trained at the National Gallery of Victoria Art School until 1929, winning a scholarship to continue her study at London’s Royal Academy of Arts. Her paintings and drawings were exhibited from the 1940s onwards, and she was one of only two women included in a major exhibition of twelve Australian artists that travelled to Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy in the early 1950s. Influenced by George Bell, Stokes was part of the Melbourne Contemporary Artists, a group Bell established in 1940, and her works continued to be well-regarded by art historians for many years after the group’s formation. Her husband’s early death in 1962 forced her to return to painting as a career, resulting in a successful one-woman show in 1964, her first in thirty years. She continued to paint and exhibit through the 1980s. Her work faded into relative obscurity after her death, until the publication of Anne Summers’ 2009 book The Lost Mother, a narrative that highlights Stokes and her paintings. Her art is represented in most major Australian galleries, including the National Gallery of Australia and the National Gallery of Victoria.

Did you know: a) that in Francisco Goya’s painting Carlos IV in his Hunting Clothes the artist showed his debt to Titian’s 1533 Charles V by showing a dog sniffing at the royal crotch? b) that pre-colonial sexual customs in the Philippines involved equating the size of a woman’s breasts and the wideness of her hips with the price of the dowry? c) that it is speculated that Codex Sinaiticus and Codex Vaticanus were commissioned by Constantine I? d) that Lawrence Turner, who presented a Parliamentary petition calling for W. S. Gilbert’s copyright on the libretti of Gilbert and Sullivan operas to be extended indefinitely, was the grandson of comic actor George Grossmith who starred in them?

Source: http://worddictionary.com.au/


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