Posted by: retarigan | April 30, 2015

Word Dictionary [300415]


Word of the day: insomnia
Definition: n. habitual sleeplessness; inability to sleep.
Synonyms: hypersomnia
Etymology: L f. insomnis sleepless (as IN-(1), somnus sleep) (more…)

pronunciation: ɪnˈsɔmnɪə

from Oxford: insomnia

n. habitual sleeplessness; inability to sleep.
Derivatives: insomniac n. & adj.
Etymology: L f. insomnis sleepless (as IN-(1), somnus sleep)

from Wordnet: insomnia

n : an inability to sleep; chronic sleeplessness [ant: hypersomnia]

from Wikipedia: insomnia; Insomnia, or sleeplessness, is a sleep disorder in which there is an inability to fall asleep or to stay asleep as long as desired. that can accompany several sleep, medical, and psychiatric disorders characterized by a persistent difficulty falling asleep and/or staying asleep or sleep of poor quality. Insomnia is typically followed by functional impairment while awake. Insomnia can occur at any age, but it is particularly common in the elderly. Insomnia can be short term (up to three weeks) or long term (above 3–4 weeks); it can lead to memory problems, depression, irritability and an increased risk of heart disease and automobile related accidents.Those who are having trouble sleeping sometimes turn to sleeping pills, which may help, but also may lead to substance dependency or addiction if used regularly for an extended period.Insomnia can be grouped into primary and secondary, or comorbid, insomnia. Primary insomnia is a sleep disorder not attributable to a medical, psychiatric, or environmental cause. It is described as a complaint of prolonged sleep onset latency, disturbance of sleep maintenance, or the experience of non-refreshing sleep. A complete diagnosis will differentiate between free-standing primary insomnia, insomnia as secondary to another condition, and primary insomnia co-morbid with one or more conditions.

Quote of the day: A government that robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul. by George Bernard Shaw

Philip III of France

Philip III of France

Birthday of the day: Philip III of France; Philip III (30 April 1245 – 5 October 1285), called the Bold (French: le Hardi), was the King of France, succeeding his father, Louis IX, and reigning from 1270 to 1285. He was a member of the House of Capet.

Joke of the day: A defendant in a lawsuit involving large sums of money was talking to his lawyer. ‘If I lose this case, I’ll be ruined.’ ‘It’s in the judge’s hands now,’ said the lawyer. ‘Would it help if I sent the judge a box of cigars?’ ‘Oh no! This judge is a stickler or ethical behavior. A stunt like that would prejudice him against you. He might even hold you in contempt of court. In fact, you shouldn’t even smile at the judge.’ Within the course of time, the judge rendered a decision in favor of the defendant. As the defendant left the courthouse, he said to his lawyer, ‘Thanks for the tip about the cigars. It worked!’ ‘I’m sure we would have lost the case if you’d sent them.’ ‘But, I did send them.’ ‘What? You did?’ said the lawyer, incredulously. ‘Yes. That’s how we won the case.’ ‘I don’t understand,’ said the lawyer. ‘It’s easy. I sent the cigars to the judge, but enclosed the plaintiff’s business card.’

Thought of the day: Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.

Fact of the day: 311 – The Diocletianic Persecution of Christians in the Roman Empire ends.

Biography of the day: Vivian Malone Jones; Vivian Malone Jones (15 July 1942-13 Oct. 2005), civil rights activist, was born Vivian Juanita Malone in Mobile, Alabama, to Willie Malone, a carpenter and maintenance man, and Bertha Malone, a maid. She was the oldest of eight children–three boys and five girls. When Vivian was twelve years old, her curiosity about racially segregated public education was aroused, although she did not recognize it at the time. A front-page story in the Mobile newspaper discussed the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education, which in 1954 outlawed segregation in public schools. Vivian questioned her mother about the meaning of the decision. Vivian knew already that she wanted to attend college and major in business, yet the ruling instilled in her the idea that she could achieve anything if she put her mind to it. She was also a capable student and belonged to the National Honor Society while in high school.

Article of the day: Æthelwold; Æthelwold was a son of King Alfred the Great’s older brother, Æthelred, who was King of Wessex from 865 to 871. While the West Saxons were fighting a Danish Viking invasion, Æthelred died; his sons were infants, so Alfred became king. He defeated the Vikings at the Battle of Edington in 878, but when he died in 899 the Vikings still controlled Northumbria and East Anglia. In his will (pictured) Alfred favoured his own children over his brother’s. Æthelwold, as senior ætheling (prince of the royal dynasty eligible for kingship), had a strong claim to the throne, and he disputed the crown with Alfred’s son, Edward the Elder. Æthelwold attempted to raise an army to support his claim, but was unable to get sufficient support to meet Edward in battle and fled to Northumbria, where he was accepted by the Danes as king. In 902 he persuaded the East Anglian Vikings to launch an attack on Edward’s territory in Wessex and Mercia. Edward retaliated with a raid on East Anglia, and when he withdrew, his men from Kent lingered and met the East Anglian Danes at the Battle of the Holme. The Danes were victorious but suffered heavy losses, including the death of Æthelwold, ending the challenge to Edward’s rule.

Did you know: a) that the Rowan County War resulted in 20 deaths, talk of dissolving Rowan County, Kentucky, and the founding of what would become Morehead State University? b) that transit of cargo between the Croatian Port of Ploce (pictured) and Bosnia and Herzegovina is exempt of duties and taxes? c) that in September 1924, Jack Fowler scored five goals in a football match for Swansea Town against Charlton Athletic, which remains the club record for most goals in a match? d) that ‘king of the paparazzi’ Felice Quinto was shot with an arrow in the course of his duty?

Source: http://worddictionary.com.au/


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