Posted by: retarigan | April 2, 2016

Word Dictionary [020416]


Word of the day: bane
Definition: n. the cause of ruin or trouble; the curse (esp. the bane of one’s life).
Synonyms: curse, scourge, nemesis
Etymology: OE bana f. Gmc (more…)

pronunciation: beɪn

from Oxford: bane

n.
1 the cause of ruin or trouble; the curse (esp. the bane of one’s life).
2 poet. ruin; woe.
3 archaic (except in comb.) poison (ratsbane).
Derivatives: baneful adj.  banefully adv.
Etymology: OE bana f. Gmc

from Wordnet: bane

n : something causes misery or death; “the bane of my life” [syn: curse, scourge, nemesis]

Quote of the day: All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible. This I did. by T. E. Lawrence

Charlemagne

Charlemagne

Birthday of the day: Charlemagne; Charlemagne (pronounced /ˈʃɑrlɨmeɪn/; Latin: Carolus Magnus or Karolus Magnus German: Karl der Große, meaning Charles the Great; possibly 742 – 28 January 814) was King of the Franks from 768 and Emperor of the Romans (Imperator Romanorum) from 800 to his death. He expanded the Frankish kingdom into an empire that incorporated much of Western and Central Europe. During his reign, he conquered Italy and was crowned Imperator Augustus by Pope Leo III on 25 December 800. This temporarily made him a rival of the Byzantine Emperor in Constantinople. His rule is also associated with the Carolingian Renaissance, a revival of art, religion, and culture through the medium of the Catholic Church. Through his foreign conquests and internal reforms, Charlemagne helped define both Western Europe and the Middle Ages. He is numbered as Charles I in the regnal lists of France, Germany (where he is known as Karl der Große), and the Holy Roman Empire.

Joke of the day: TEACHER: What is the chemical formula for water? SARAH: ‘HIJKLMNO’! TEACHER: What are you talking about? SARAH: Yesterday you said its H to O!

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