Posted by: retarigan | June 17, 2016

Word Dictionary [170616]


Word of the day: basal
Definition: adj. of, at, or forming a base.
Synonyms: radical, base, basic, primary
Etymology: BASE(1) -AL (more…)

pronunciation: ˈbeɪsl

from Oxford: basal

adj.
1 of, at, or forming a base.
2 fundamental.
Phrases and idioms: basal metabolism the chemical processes occurring in an organism at complete rest.
Etymology: BASE(1) + -AL

from Wordnet: basal

adj 1: (botany) especially of leaves; located at the base of a plant or stem; especially arising directly from the root or rootstock or a root-like stem; “basal placentation”; “radical leaves” [syn: radical] [ant: cauline]
    2: serving as or forming a base; “the painter applied a base coat followed by two finishing coats” [syn: base]
    3: of primary importance; “basic truths” [syn: basic, primary]

Quote of the day: As your faith is strengthened you will find that there is no longer the need to have a sense of control, that things will flow as they will, and that you will flow with them, to your great delight and benefit. by Emmanuel Teney

Edward I of England

Edward I of England

Birthday of the day: Edward I of England; Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots, was King of England from 1272 to 1307. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved early in the political intrigues of his father’s reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford. After reconciliation with his father, however, he remained loyal throughout the subsequent armed conflict, known as the Second Barons’ War. After the Battle of Lewes, Edward was hostage to the rebellious barons, but escaped after a few months and joined the fight against Simon de Montfort. Montfort was defeated at the Battle of Evesham in 1265, and within two years the rebellion was extinguished. With England pacified, Edward left on a crusade to the Holy Land. The crusade accomplished little, and Edward was on his way home in 1272 when he was informed that his father had died. Making a slow return, he reached England in 1274 and he was crowned king at Westminster on 19 August.

Joke of the day: Two elderly couples were enjoying friendly conversation when one of the men asked the other, ‘Fred, how was the memory clinic you went to last month?’ ‘Outstanding,’ Fred replied. ‘They taught us all the latest psychological techniques: visualization, association, etc. It was great.’ ‘That’s great! And what was the name of the clinic?’ Fred went blank. He thought and thought, but couldn’t remember. Then a smile broke across his face and he asked, ‘What do you call that flower with the long stem and thorns?’ ‘You mean a rose?’ ‘Yes, that’s it!’ He turned to his wife, ‘Rose, what was the name of that memory clinic?’

Thought of the day: The sense of wonder?that is our sixth sense.

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